CORONAVIRUS

(COVID-19)

TEMPORARY APPOINTMENT PROTOCOL:

In-person examinations and procedures will remain suspended,

until further notice.

 

We will continue to report to our office on a very limited schedule, for Telehealth treatment & remote services

for current patients.

When we re-open and resume regular office operations,

appointment and safety protocol will be strictly adjusted for the health & safety during this health crisis.

Patients must adhere to all new appointment safety guidelines in order to have an appointment.

2021 APPOINTMENT PROTOCOL

DURING COVID-19 :

You will be contacted by the office for telehealth services

when you are due to for a reevaluation and/or medication refills.

 

MEDICATION REFILLS:

Prescriptions are sent digitally to your pharmacy.

Controlled medications are strictly monitored and are prescribed and dated every 30 days.

Therefore, patients are contacted monthly.

 

**IF YOU ARE ON A CONTROLLED MEDICATION REGIMEN,

THIS IS A FRIENDLY REMINDER THAT YOUR PRESCRIPTION IS WRITTEN TO LAST NO LESS THAN 30 FULL DAYS.

CONTACT INFORMATION:

If we can not reach you by telephone during the week that you are due for a follow up,

we can not provide any services or medication prescriptions for you.

If your contact information has changed since your last appointment,

contact us as soon as possible to provide your updated information.

CONTACTING US:

You can contact us through the messaging window below, or by telephone.

 

We will answer your email and phone inquiries as soon as we can.

CORONAVIRUS VACCINE:

We urge our patients to follow-up with your

primary care physician, and/or specialist treating any underlying conditions for confirmation whether it is safe for you to receive the Covid-19 vaccine.

 

If you are able to get vaccinated for Covid-19,

We strongly urge you to do so.

Vaccine types (as of March 2021)

Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are made using messenger RNA, or mRNA, a technology that delivers a bit of genetic code to cells — in effect, a recipe to make the surface protein (known as spike) on the SARS-2 virus. The proteins made with the mRNA instructions activate the immune system, teaching it to see the spike protein as foreign and develop antibodies and other immunity weapons with which to fight it.

The J&J vaccine uses a different approach to instruct human cells to make the SARS-2 spike protein, which then triggers an immune response. It is what’s known as a viral vectored vaccine. A harmless adenovirus — from a large family of viruses, some of which cause common colds — has been engineered to carry the genetic code for the SARS-2 spike protein. Once the adenovirus enters cells, they use that code to make spike proteins.  J&J employed this same approach to make an Ebola vaccine that has been authorized for use by the European Medicines Agency.

 

Target population (data as of March 2021)

The Pfizer vaccine has been authorized for use for people aged 16 and older. Moderna’s has been cleared for use in people 18 and older, though the company is now testing its vaccine in 12- to 17-year-olds. J&J’s vaccine has been tested in people 18 and older, and that’s who it was authorized for. Until testing in children and younger teens is conducted, this vaccine won’t be available for use anyone under 18 years old either.

 

Vaccine efficacy (data as of March 2021)

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines have shown astonishing — and essentially equivalent — degrees of efficacy, at least in the early stages after vaccination.

The Pfizer vaccine showed efficacy of 95% at preventing symptomatic Covid infection after two doses. The vaccine appeared to be more or less equally protective across age groups and racial and ethnic groups.

The Bottom Line

Getting vaccinated is one of many steps you can take to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.  Protection from COVID-19 is critically important because for some people, COVID-19 can cause severe illness or death.

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available. Vaccines work with your immune system so your body will be ready to fight the virus if you are exposed. After you are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you may be able to start doing some things that you had stopped doing because of the pandemic. But we’re still learning how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19. After you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you should keep taking precautions in public places or when you are with unvaccinated people from more than one household.

Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

We hope you stay safe and well.  We look forward to speaking with you soon.

© 2015 by Tyson's Pain Center, PC.